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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/9778

Title: Specialty-based, voluntary incident reporting in neonatal intensive care: description of 4846 incident reports
Authors: Snijders, C.
van Lingen, R. A.
Klip, H.
Fetter, W. P. F.
VAN DER SCHAAF, Tjerk
Molendijk, Harry A.
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: B M J PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation: ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION, 94(3). p. F210-F215
Abstract: Objectives: To examine the characteristics of incidents reported after introduction of a voluntary, non-punitive incident reporting system for neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the Netherlands; and to investigate which types of reported incident pose the highest risk to patients in the NICU. Design: Prospective multicentre survey. Methods: Voluntary, non-punitive incident reporting was introduced in eight level III NICUs and one paediatric surgical ICU. An incident was defined as any unintended event which (could have) reduced the safety margin for the patient. Multidisciplinary, unit-based patient safety committees systematically collected and analysed incident reports, and assigned risk scores to each reported incident, Data were centrally collected for specialty-based analysis. This paper describes the characteristics of incidents reported during the first year. Bivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify high-risk incident categories. Results: There were 5225 incident reports on 3859 admissions, of which 4846 were eligible for analysis. Incidents with medication were most frequently reported (27%), followed by laboratory (10%) and enteral nutrition (8%). Severe harm was described in seven incident reports, and moderate harm in 63 incident reports. Incidents involving mechanical ventilation and blood products were most likely to be assigned high-risk scores, followed by those involving parenteral nutrition, intravascular lines and medication dosing errors. Conclusions: Incidents occur much more frequently in Dutch NICUs than has been previously observed, and their impact on patient morbidity is considerable. Reported incidents concerning mechanical ventilation, blood products, intravascular lines, parenteral nutrition and medication dosing errors pose the highest risk to patients in the NICU.
Notes: Locat Juliana Childrens Hosp, Haga Hosp, NL-2566 MJ The Hague, Netherlands. [Snijders, C.; van Lingen, R. A.; Molendijk, H. A.] Isala Clin, Princess Amalia Dept Paediat, Div Neonatol, Zwolle, Netherlands. [Snijders, C.] Haga Hosp, Juliana Childrens Hosp, The Hague, Netherlands. [Klip, H.] Isala Clin, Res Bur, Zwolle, Netherlands. [Fetter, W. P. F.] Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Paediat, Div Neonatol, Amsterdam, Netherlands. [van der Schaaf, T. W.] Hasselt Univ, Div Patient Safety, Diepenbeek, Belgium. [van der Schaaf, T. W.] Eindhoven Univ Technol, Fac Technol Management, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/9778
DOI: 10.1136/adc.2007.135020
ISI #: 000265951300012
ISSN: 1359-2998
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Validation: ecoom, 2010
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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