www.uhasselt.be
DSpace

Document Server@UHasselt >
Research >
All items >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/9263

Title: Do the benefits of alendronate for premenopausal women on high-dose glucocorticoids outweigh the risks?
Authors: Lems, William F.
GEUSENS, Piet
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation: NATURE CLINICAL PRACTICE RHEUMATOLOGY, 5(2). p. 74-75
Abstract: Few data are available on the prevention of fracture in glucocorticoid-treated premenopausal women with autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus. In this setting, Okada et al. compared the effect of coadministration of alfacalcidol alone with that of alfacalcidol combined with alendronate. After 12 months of treatment, lumbar spine bone mineral density increased by 1.7% in the combination group, but decreased by 9.9% in the alfacalcidol-only group (P < 0.001). Importantly, although no vertebral fractures were observed in the alendronate group, four patients in the alfacalcidol-only group experienced a vertebral fracture within 12-18 months of treatment. Although these data suggest that alendronate improves bone mineral density, we do not recommend the routine use of bisphosphonates in premenopausal women. Our reasons include the long-term skeletal retention of bisphosphonates, and the possible inhibitory effects on fetal skeletal maturation in pregnant patients. In addition, recent data suggest that premenopausal women who undergo glucocorticoid therapy have a low 10-year absolute risk of fracture.
Notes: [Lems, William F.] Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Rheumatol, Med Ctr, NL-1007 MB Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Geusens, Piet P.] Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Maastricht, Netherlands. [Geusens, Piet P.] Univ Hasselt, Hasselt, Belgium.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/9263
ISI #: 000263091400006
ISSN: 1745-8382
Category: M
Type: Journal Contribution
Appears in Collections: Biomedical Research Institute
Immunology - Biochemistry

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.