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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/9163

Title: Using the Phantom Device for Rehabilition of the Arm in MS Patients: a Case Study
Authors: CONINX, Karin
RAYMAEKERS, Chris
DE BOECK, Joan
DE WEYER, Tom
ALDERS, Geert
GIJBELS, Domien
OP 'T EIJNDE, Bert
FEYS, Peter
Issue Date: 2008
Citation: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Methods and Techniques in Behavioral Research (Measuring Behavior 2008). p. 148-149.
Abstract: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system. Depending on the distribution of lesions within the brain, MS may clinically present with impairments of strength, muscle tone, sensation, co-ordination, balance, bladder and bowel function, as well as visual and cognitive deficits, often leading to severe limitations of functioning in daily life. Studies of exercise therapy, focused on balance and walking outcome parameters, have shown a beneficial effect regarding muscle strength, exercise tolerance level, functional mobility and quality of life, while no important deleterious effects were reported. Very few studies have properly investigated the therapeutic potential of arm training in persons with MS. Because training duration and training intensity are considered to be key factors for a successful neurological rehabilitation, we are investigating the value of robot-assisted rehabilitation of the upper extremity in persons with MS. More concretely, a virtual environment (VE) has been realized, which provides the patients with the training tasks to be carried out and monitors their progress and success rate. Not only visual feedback is presented in this VE; in order to train the patients with the execution of natural movements, a Phantom device is used, which generates force and thus proprioceptive feedback.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/9163
ISBN: 978-90-74821-81-0
Category: C1
Type: Proceedings Paper
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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