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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/8991

Title: LOWER ARM AND HAND MUSCLES IN FOCAL DYSTONIAS - SOME ANATOMICAL AND THERAPEUTIC ASPECTS
Authors: VAN ZWIETEN, Koos Jaap
Lambrichts, Dries
Nackaerts, Katrien
HAUGLUSTAINE, Stephan
SCHMIDT, Klaus
BEX, Geert Jan
MEWIS, Alex
DUYVENDAK, Wim
NARAIN, Faridi
Lamur, K. S.
LIPPENS, Peter
Zinkovsky, A. V.
Sholukha, V. A.
IVANOV, Alexandre
Potekhin, V. V.
Piskùn, O. E.
Varzin, S. A.
ZOUBOVA, Irina
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University,
Citation: Varein, S.A. & Tarasovskaia, O.E. (Ed.) Transactions of the 3rd All-Russian Scientific Practical Conference with international participants “Health as the basis of human potential : problems and how to solve them” November 25 - 27, 2008, Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia.. p. 353-363.
Abstract: Computer simulation of normal goal-oriented motion of human lower arm and hand may be also successfully applied in studying movement disorders, known as focal dystonias. Upper limb focal dystonia includes disturbed muscle tension balances, leading to painful, impaired and often aberrant motions. In their attempts to trace the backgrounds of this disorder, several authors have stressed the importance of the brain primary somatosensory cortex, and its role in brain-mapping. This turns out to be especially relevant during learning processes of new motor skills like practising by musicians. The present overview however will mainly analyse musculoskeletal mechanisms of arm and hand movements, with regard to their kinematics in repetitive motions. We will concentrate on pronation and supination movements of the lower arm during repeated shifting of the hand, as in handling a computer mouse, and focus on the maintaining of stable finger position during PC mouse scrolling. Physical therapy (PT) already proved itself useful in treating these focal dystonias, also known as repetitive strain injury (RSI). As an adjuvant to PT, we wish to propose local vibration therapies. Encouraging results of such a treatment, emanating from a recent pilot-study, are presented in conclusion.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/8991
ISBN: 978-5-7422-2020-6
Category: C1
Type: Proceedings Paper
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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