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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/8275

Title: A new family of lysozyme inhibitors contributing to lysozyme tolerance in gram-negative bacteria
Authors: Callewaert, L.
Aertsen, A.
Deckers, D.
Vanoirbeek, K.G.A.
Vanderkelen, L.
Van Herreweghe, J.M.
Masschalck, B.
Nakimbugwe, D.
Robben, Johan
Michiels, C.W.
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
Citation: PLOS PATHOGENS, 4(3)
Abstract: Lysozymes are ancient and important components of the innate immune system of animals that hydrolyze peptidoglycan, the major bacterial cell wall polymer. Bacteria engaging in commensal or pathogenic interactions with an animal host have evolved various strategies to evade this bactericidal enzyme, one recently proposed strategy being the production of lysozyme inhibitors. We here report the discovery of a novel family of bacterial lysozyme inhibitors with widespread homologs in gram-negative bacteria. First, a lysozyme inhibitor was isolated by affinity chromatography from a periplasmic extract of Salmonella Enteritidis, identified by mass spectrometry and correspondingly designated as PliC (periplasmic lysozyme inhibitor of c-type lysozyme). A pliC knock-out mutant no longer produced lysozyme inhibitory activity and showed increased lysozyme sensitivity in the presence of the outer membrane permeabilizing protein lactoferrin. PliC lacks similarity with the previously described Escherichia coli lysozyme inhibitor Ivy, but is related to a group of proteins with a common conserved COG3895 domain, some of them predicted to be lipoproteins. No function has yet been assigned to these proteins, although they are widely spread among the Proteobacteria. We demonstrate that at least two representatives of this group, MliC (membrane bound lysozyme inhibitor of c-type lysozyme) of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also possess lysozyme inhibitory activity and confer increased lysozyme tolerance upon expression in E. coli. Interestingly, mliC of Salmonella Typhi was picked up earlier in a screen for genes induced during residence in macrophages, and knockout of mliC was shown to reduce macrophage survival of S. Typhi. Based on these observations, we suggest that the COG3895 domain is a common feature of a novel and widespread family of bacterial lysozyme inhibitors in gram-negative bacteria that may function as colonization or virulence factors in bacteria interacting with an animal host.
Notes: Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Microbial & Mol Syst M2S, Food Microbiol Lab, Louvain, Belgium. Hasselt Univ, Biomed Res Inst, Diepenbeek, Belgium. Transnatl Univ Limburg, Sch Life Sci, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/8275
DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1000019
ISI #: 000255417700020
ISSN: 1553-7366
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Validation: ecoom, 2009
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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