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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/660

Title: Effect of the number of uninvolved nodes on survival in early breast cancer
Authors: Vinh-Hung, Vincent
Cserni, Gabor
BURZYKOWSKI, Tomasz
Van de Steene, Jan
Voordeckers, Mia
Storme, Guy
Keywords: Statistical methodology
Issue Date: 2003
Publisher: PROFESSOR D A SPANDIDOS
Citation: Oncology Reports, 10(2). p. 363-368
Abstract: A high number of uninvolved axillary nodes was found by some authors to be associated with poor survival in node-negative breast cancer. We searched for confirmation and extend the investigation to node-positive cases, using population data from the SEER Program. Patients selected were women aged 40-69 years, diagnosed 1988-1997, T1-T2 breast cancer, undergoing axillary dissection with 4-35 nodes examined. Survivals were estimated by the product-limit method and were computed on pooled data. Results in nodenegative patients (n=37,519) showed a 5-year overall survival from 92% (95% confidence interval: 88-95%) with 4 uninvolved nodes, to 93% (87-98%) with 34 uninvolved nodes. In node-positive patients (n=16,978), the 5-year survival increased from 50% (44-56%) with 0 uninvolved nodes, to 91% (82-100%) with 30 uninvolved nodes. Survival graphs indicated an improvement or a plateau with higher number of uninvolved nodes. The graphs also suggested that the ratio of involved and uninvolved nodes might be correlated with survival. We conclude that there was no evidence of poor outcome associated with a high number of uninvolved nodes. The incidental finding that ratio-based characterization of node involvement might be a prognostic factor will be further investigated.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/660
ISI #: 000181024200018
ISSN: 1021-335X
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Validation: ecoom, 2004
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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