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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/5294

Title: In-situ electrical and spectroscopical techniques for the study of degradation mechanisms and life time prediction of organic based electronic material systems
Authors: MANCA, Jean
GORIS, Ludwig
KESTERS, Els
LUTSEN, Laurence
MARTENS, Tom
HAENEN, Ken
NESLADEK, Milos
VANDERZANDE, Dirk
D'HAEN, Jan
DE SCHEPPER, Luc
SANNA, Ornella
Issue Date: 2003
Publisher: MATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY
Citation: Blom, PWM & Greenham, NC & Dimitrakopoulos, CD & Frisbie, CD (Ed.) ORGANIC AND POLYMERIC MATERIALS AND DEVICES. p. 383-389.
Series/Report: MATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS, 771
Abstract: In order to tailor the synthesis of new robust organic materials for electronic applications and to guarantee the required life time for the emerging commercial plastic electronic applications it is of key importance to understand the underlying degradation mechanisms. Since plastic electronics is a rather young technology introducing new material systems, its reliability is characterized by new failure and degradation mechanisms, a relatively high amount of early failures and multi-modal failure distributions. To understand the mechanism responsible for a given failure or degradation mode, it is essential to study it separately, through appropriate test structures and test techniques. Powerful techniques for this purpose are a.o. analytical techniques (SEM, TEM, SPM,..), in-situ electrical measurement techniques and spectroscopical techniques (in-situ FTIR, in-situ UV-Vis, PDS). The benefits of these in-situ techniques in the reliability study of organic based electronics will be illustrated in this contribution.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/5294
ISI #: 000185782000061
ISBN: 1-55899-708-3
ISSN: 0272-9172
Category: C1
Type: Proceedings Paper
Validation: ecoom, 2004
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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