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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/26686

Title: Do a humanoid robot and music increase the motivation to perform physical activity? A quasi-experimental cohort in typical developing children and preliminary findings in hospitalized children in neutropenia
Authors: Meyns, Pieter
van der Spank, Judith
Capiau, Hanne
De Cock, Lieve
Van Steirteghem, Eline
Van der Looven, Ruth
Van Waelvelde, Hilde
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HUMAN-COMPUTER STUDIES, 122, p. 90-102
Abstract: Background: It can be difficult to motivate children to participate in physical exercises, especially when they have oncological disorders. Purpose: examine the effect of a humanoid robot and music on motivation to participate in physical activity in typically developing children (TDC) and children with oncological disorders (COD). Methods: Two cohort studies were conducted; in an elementary school in Belgium (N=75TDC, 4-13years) and pediatric cancer ward of Ghent University Hospital (N=13COD, 3-15years). Participants completed four gross motor exercise conditions; with a human or humanoid robot instructor and with or without music. Motivation was assessed using the Smileyometer (amount of fun), Again score (amount of chosen repetitions) and Fun Sorter (which condition was most fun). Results: TDC indicated higher Smileyometer-scores in the two conditions with music. The Again score revealed no preference in either group. In TDC and COD, the results of the Fun Sorter indicated that conditions with music or the robot were more fun than without music or with the human instructor. The combination of the robot and music was most preferred. Conclusions: Music or a humanoid robot seemed to increase children's initial motivation to participate in physical activity, also in hospitalized COD. Further research should evaluate the long-term effects.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/26686
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijhcs.2018.07.010
ISI #: 000454375700007
ISSN: 1071-5819
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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