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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/25993

Title: Salt-responsive gut commensal modulates TH17 axis and disease
Authors: Wilck, Nicola
Matus, Mariana G.
Kearney, Sean M.
Olesen, Scott W.
Forslund, Kristoffer
Bartolomaeus, Hendrik
Jörg, Stefanie
Mähler, Anja
Balogh, András
Markó, Lajos
Vvedenskaya, Olga
Kleiner, Friedrich H.
Tsvetkov, Dmitry
Klug, Lars
Costea, Paul I.
Sunagawa, Shinichi
Maier, Lisa
Rakova, Natalia
Schatz, Valentin
Neubert, Patrick
Frätzer, Christian
Krannich, Alexander
Gollasch, Maik
Grohme, Diana A.
Côrte-Real, Beatriz F.
Gerlach, Roman G.
Basic, Marijana
Typas, Athanasios
Wu, Chuan
Titze, Jens M.
Jantsch, Jonathan
Boschmann, Michael
Dechend, Ralf
Kleinewietfeld, Markus
Kempa, Stefan
Bork, Peer
Linker, Ralf A.
Alm, Eric J.
Müller, Dominik N.
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: NATURE, 551(7682), p. 585-589
Abstract: A Western lifestyle with high salt consumption can lead to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. High salt may additionally drive autoimmunity by inducing T helper 17 (TH17) cells, which can also contribute to hypertension. Induction of TH17 cells depends on gut microbiota; however, the effect of salt on the gut microbiome is unknown. Here we show that high salt intake affects the gut microbiome in mice, particularly by depleting Lactobacillus murinus. Consequently, treatment of mice with L. murinus prevented salt-induced aggravation of actively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and salt-sensitive hypertension by modulating TH17 cells. In line with these findings, a moderate high-salt challenge in a pilot study in humans reduced intestinal survival of Lactobacillus spp., increased TH17 cells and increased blood pressure. Our results connect high salt intake to the gut–immune axis and highlight the gut microbiome as a potential therapeutic target to counteract salt-sensitive conditions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/25993
DOI: 10.1038/nature24628
ISI #: 000416520400034
ISSN: 0028-0836
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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