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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/2149

Title: Translevator posterior intravaginal slingplasty: anatomical landmarks and safety margins
Authors: Smajda, S
VANORMELINGEN, Linda
VANDEWALLE, Giovani
OMBELET, Willem
DE JONGE, Eric
HINOUL, Piet
Issue Date: 2005
Publisher: SPRINGER LONDON LTD
Citation: INTERNATIONAL UROGYNECOLOGY JOURNAL, 16(5). p. 364-368
Abstract: The posterior intravaginal sling is a new tension-free needle suspension technique. It is used for the treatment of middle compartment (vaginal vault or uterine) prolapse. The Prolene sling suspends the vagina at the upper border of level II support as described by DeLancey (Am J Obstet Gynecol 166:1717, 1992). Human cadaveric dissections were undertaken to explore the pertinent anatomy that is involved when using this blind needle technique. Pre-dissected cadaveric material was used to obtain didactic illustrations of the anatomy of the procedure. Description of the surgical technique using anatomical landmarks and relative distances of the needle to these landmarks will improve the surgeon's visual understanding of the procedure. The measurements obtained demonstrate that the needle stays at a minimal distance of 4 cm away from the major (pudendal) vessels that could potentially cause life-threatening haemorrhage.
Notes: Clin St Anne St Remi, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, B-1070 Brussels, Belgium. Ziekenhuis Oost Limburg, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, B-3600 Genk, Belgium. Limburgs Univ Ctr, Dept Human Anat, B-3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium.Smajda, S, Clin St Anne St Remi, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Bd Graindor 66, B-1070 Brussels, Belgium.dr_smajda@hotmail.com
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/2149
DOI: 10.1007/s00192-004-1264-3
ISI #: 000232340300009
ISSN: 0937-3462
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Validation: ecoom, 2006
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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