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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/21098

Title: Development of biosensors for the detection of histamine for intestinal application
Authors: BONGAERS, Evi
Advisors: Wagner, Patrick
Troost, Freddy
Issue Date: 2009
Abstract: In recent health care is a growing need for bio- and chemosensors for the rapid and accurate detection of molecules. A biosensor uses a recognition element of biological origin. Immunosensors in particular are biosensors that use antibodies or immunoglobulines as their biological recognition element. Sensing systems based on biological recognition elements have some restrictions, limiting their use. Replacing the biological recognition element by a chemical receptor is therefore becoming of increasing interest. As opposed to the sensors containing biological recognition elements, biomimetic sensors, containing artificial receptors, are chemically and physically inert. Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) the specificity and affinity of biological receptors can be mimicked. In addition, a MIP-based sensor can measure in harsh environments. This is beneficial for the use of sensors in vivo, in bodily fluids or in the intestines, for example in research for the Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). The IBS is characterized by visceral hypersensitivity. The pathogenesis is poorly understood, but there is evidence that mast cells are involved in this process. Mast cells degranulate upon activation, and release histamine, tryptase and other compounds. The accessibility of the intestine makes it difficult to measure this intestinal mast cell activation in vivo. Therefore a biosensor for the detection of histamine and tryptase in vivo in the intestine is developed....
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/21098
Category: T1
Type: Theses and Dissertations
Appears in Collections: PhD theses
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