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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/16541

Title: 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone improves memory consolidation processes in rats and mice.
Authors: Bollen, Eva
VANMIERLO, Tim
Akkerman, Sven
Wouters, C.
STEINBUSCH, Harry
Prickaerts, Jos
Issue Date: 2013
Citation: BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 257, p. 8-12
Abstract: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a crucial regulator of neuronal survival and neuroplasticity in the central nervous system (CNS). As a result, there has been a growing interest in the role of BDNF in neuropsychiatric disorders associated with neurodegeneration, including depression and dementia. However, until now, BDNF-targeting therapies have yielded disappointing results. BDNF is thought to exert its beneficial effects on synaptic and neuronal plasticity mainly through binding to the tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) receptor. Recently, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) was identified as the first selective TrkB agonist. In the present study the effect of 7,8-DHF on memory consolidation processes was evaluated. In healthy rats, 7,8-DHF improved object memory formation in the object recognition task when administered both immediately and 3h after learning. In a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, i.e. APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, spatial memory as measured in the object location task was improved after administration of 7,8-DHF. A similar memory improvement was found when their wild-type littermates were treated with 7,8-DHF. The acute beneficial effects in healthy mice suggest that effects might be symptomatic rather than curing. Nevertheless, this study suggests that 7,8-DHF might be a promising therapeutic target for dementia.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/16541
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2013.09.029
ISI #: 000328519200002
ISSN: 0166-4328
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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