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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/15954

Title: Hypoxia-mimetic Effects in the Secretome of Human Preadipocytes and Adipocytes.
Authors: Rosenow, Anja
Noben, Jean-Paul
Bouwman, Freek
MARIMAN, Edwin
Renes, Johan
Issue Date: 2013
Citation: BIOCHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA ACTA-PROTEINS AND PROTEOMICS, 1834 (12), p. 2761-2771
Abstract: White adipose tissue (WAT) regulates energy metabolismby secretion of proteins with endocrine and paracrine effects. Dysregulation of the secretome of obesity-associated enlarged WAT may lead to obesity related disorders. This can be caused by hypoxia as a result of poorly vascularized WAT. The effect of hypoxia on the secretome of human (pre)adipocytes is largely unknown. Therefore,we investigated the effect of CoCl2, a hypoxia mimetic, on the secretome of human SGBS (pre)adipocytes by a proteomics approach combined with bioinformatic analysis. In addition, regulation of protein secretion was examined by protein turnover experiments. As such, secretome changes were particularly associated with protein down-regulation and extracellular matrix protein dysregulation. The observed up-regulation of collagens in adipocytes may be essential for cell survival while down-regulation of collagens in preadipocytes may indicate a disturbed differentiation process. These CoCl2-induced changes reflect WAT dysfunction that ultimately may lead to obesity-associated complications. In addition, 9 novel adipocyte secreted proteins were identified from which 6were regulated by CoCl2.Mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000162. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/15954
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbapap.2013.10.003
ISI #: 000329418300034
ISSN: 1570-9639
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Validation: ecoom, 2015
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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