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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/10301

Title: Phytoremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater: lessons from the field
Authors: VANGRONSVELD, Jaco
Herzig, Rolf
WEYENS, Nele
BOULET, Jana
ADRIAENSEN, Kristin
RUTTENS, Ann
THEWYS, Theo
Vassilev, Andon
Meers, Eric
Nehnevajova, Erika
van der Lelie, Daniël
Mench, Michel
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: SPRINGER HEIDELBERG
Citation: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 16(7). p. 765-794
Abstract: The use of plants and associated microorganisms to remove, contain, inactivate, or degrade harmful environmental contaminants (generally termed phytoremediation) and to revitalize contaminated sites is gaining more and more attention. In this review, prerequisites for a successful remediation will be discussed. The performance of phytoremediation as an environmental remediation technology indeed depends on several factors including the extent of soil contamination, the availability and accessibility of contaminants for rhizosphere microorganisms and uptake into roots (bioavailability), and the ability of the plant and its associated microorganisms to intercept, absorb, accumulate, and/or degrade the contaminants. The main aim is to provide an overview of existing field experience in Europe concerning the use of plants and their associated microorganisms whether or not combined with amendments for the revitalization or remediation of contaminated soils and undeep groundwater. Contaminations with trace elements (except radionuclides) and organics will be considered. Because remediation with transgenic organisms is largely untested in the field, this topic is not covered in this review. Brief attention will be paid to the economical aspects, use, and processing of the biomass. It is clear that in spite of a growing public and commercial interest and the success of several pilot studies and field scale applications more fundamental research still is needed to better exploit the metabolic diversity of the plants themselves, but also to better understand the complex interactions between contaminants, soil, plant roots, and microorganisms (bacteria and mycorrhiza) in the rhizosphere. Further, more data are still needed to quantify the underlying economics, as a support for public acceptance and last but not least to convince policy makers and stakeholders (who are not very familiar with such techniques).
Notes: [Vangronsveld, Jaco; Weyens, Nele; Boulet, Jana; Adriaensen, Kristin; Ruttens, Ann; Thewys, Theo] Hasselt Univ, Ctr Environm Sci, B-3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium. [Herzig, Rolf; Nehnevajova, Erika] Phytotech Fdn PT F, CH-3013 Bern, Switzerland. [Herzig, Rolf; Nehnevajova, Erika] AGB Arbeitsgemeinschaft Bioindikat, Umweltbeobachtung & Okol Planung, CH-3013 Bern, Switzerland. [Vassilev, Andon] Agr Univ Plovdiv, Plovdiv, Bulgaria. [Meers, Erik] Univ Ghent, Lab Analyt Chem & Appl Ecochem, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. [van der Lelie, Daniel] Brookhaven Natl Lab, Dept Biol, Upton, NY 11973 USA. [Mench, Michel] Univ Bordeaux 1, BIOGECO, INRA, UMR 1202, F-33405 Talence, France.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/10301
DOI: 10.1007/s11356-009-0213-6
ISI #: 000271398300003
ISSN: 0944-1344
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Validation: ecoom, 2010
Appears in Collections: Research publications

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